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Over the course of the past four years, incarcerated students have tapped into federal Pell Grants to help fund their college pursuits. With the recent agreement in Congress to lift a 25 year-old ban, 463,000 more may gain this opportunity. How will colleges respond? And, in the wake of Covid-19, will colleges be prepared to expand degree programs to the prison population?

To find out, The Chronicle conducted a survey gathering over 750 responses from college administrators and faculty members, in addition to in-depth interviews with students, instructors, and prison-education experts.

Download the Research Brief, The Expanding Role of Colleges in Prison Education, to read the survey results which examine both the potential opportunities, along with challenges, prison education presents including: 
  • Stories from real students who have benefited from college programs behind bars
  • Lessons learned about what works and what doesn’t
  • Second chances through education

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Reversing a 25-year ban, Congress recently agreed to expand Pell Grants to incarcerated students. Now some 463,000 people behind bars have the opportunity to access higher education. How will colleges respond? And, in the wake of Covid-19, are colleges prepared to offer degree programs to the prison population?

To find out, The Chronicle conducted a survey gathering over 750 responses from college administrators and faculty members, in addition to in-depth interviews with students, instructors, and prison-education experts.

Download the Research Brief, The Expanding Role of Colleges in Prison Education, to read the survey results which examine both the potential opportunities, along with challenges, prison education presents including: 
  • Stories from real students who have benefited from college programs behind bars
  • Lessons learned about what works and what doesn’t
  • Second chances through education
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