.
Two years ago, higher ed took on a transformation within a matter of months that normally would have taken years. Now that campuses have returned to in-person learning, questions remain as to the best way forward. Should they continue to emphasize in-person learning? Or should they pivot to more online and virtual learning long term?

In an effort to understand the different viewpoints on campus, The Chronicle conducted a survey of 409 administrators, 413 faculty members, and 414 students to learn how they felt about the learning models today. Strategic Student Engagement, in the Classroom and Beyond contains analysis of the survey responses. Download the Research Brief to explore the findings, including:

What students actually want: 39% of students surveyed prefer a mix of in-person and virtual classes, with 31% preferring all in person and 22% all virtual

Digital-learning capabilities: 40% of students said their college’s digital-learning capabilities were better than most, compared with just 24% of faculty and 27% of administrators

Balancing the options: 49% of administrators strongly agreed that a form of digital learning is key to their institution’s future, while only 32% of faculty felt this way

 .
Two years ago, higher ed took on a transformation within a matter of months that normally would have taken years. Now that campuses have returned to in-person learning, questions remain as to the best way forward. Should they continue to emphasize in-person learning? Or should they pivot to more online and virtual learning long term?

In an effort to understand the different viewpoints on campus, The Chronicle conducted a survey of 409 administrators, 413 faculty members, and 414 students to learn how they felt about the learning models today. Strategic Student Engagement, in the Classroom and Beyond contains analysis of the survey responses. Download the Research Brief to explore the findings, including:

What students actually want: 39% of students surveyed prefer a mix of in-person and virtual classes, with 31% preferring all in person and 22% all virtual

Digital-learning capabilities: 40% of students said their college’s digital-learning capabilities were better than most, compared with just 24% of faculty and 27% of administrators

Balancing the options: 49% of administrators strongly agreed that a form of digital learning is key to their institution’s future, while only 32% of faculty felt this way
 .
 .